Who Are We Writing For?

An audience is the target of your communication. Written communication is an odd duck because the transmission is not immediate. When you speak to someone in person, the communication is rooted at that particular moment. The written word typically exists without a direct interface. This is important because for a connection to be made, theContinue reading “Who Are We Writing For?”

Word Count Woes

By Eleanor Shelton As we all know, stories have a beginning, middle, and end. Nothing new there. But just how many words it takes to get there is highly regulated, especially for debut novelists. All novels should be at least 60,000 words. Otherwise, they’re novellas. Less than 20,000, and they’re short stories. And depending onContinue reading “Word Count Woes”

The Weird And Wonderful Habits We Love

By Ronda Simmons So, I’m in my office staring at a blank screen. I can’t figure out what’s wrong. My dog is sleeping at my feet, a hot cup of tea sits next to my keyboard, and the house is quiet. Why can’t I write? I’m not hungry, or itchy, or tired. I am notContinue reading “The Weird And Wonderful Habits We Love”

The Highs And Lows of Writing

By David E. Sharp When I naively embarked on a quest to write and publish my first novel, I felt like I was climbing a mountain. Every step took me closer to the summit. Sometimes it seemed within reach. Other times I couldn’t see it, and I questioned whether it was really up there. ButContinue reading “The Highs And Lows of Writing”

I Am A Literary Hypochondriac

By Eleanor Shelton I come by it, naturally. My aunt was always dying of something horrible (she actually did die of something terrible). My grandmother was convinced she had cancer (she never had cancer). If I have a headache, an ache, a pain, I’m sure I have COVID, an autoimmune disease, or malignant tumors. JustContinue reading “I Am A Literary Hypochondriac”

Imposter Syndrome

By David E. Sharp I recently served on a panel for the Greeley Creative District with several other “area creatives” gifted in art, music, writing, and various other ventures. The topic centered around a familiar issue: Imposter Syndrome. What is it? How do we cope? And when have we accomplished enough that we can stopContinue reading “Imposter Syndrome”

Talk Nerdy to Me

By Miranda Brit Bored of being at home? Tired of playing the same old games over and over again? How about some Dungeons & Dragons (D&D for short)? It’s fun for the whole family, and it’s an excellent writing aid to boot.  What does D&D have to do with writing, you ask? More than you’dContinue reading “Talk Nerdy to Me”

Confessions of A NaNoWriMo Failure

By Ronda Simmons Have you heard of NaNoWriMo? It stands for National Novel Writing Month. The challenge is to write an entire first draft, fifty thousand words, during November. If things go well, you’ll have a manuscript at the end of the thirty days of the eleventh month.

Five Books I’m Glad I Read in School

By Brian Kaufman I asked a writer friend if he’d ever read a particular classic novel. His face puckered up as he admitted, “Yes, I had to read that for school.” There’s not enough time for all the great books. My friend, author Pat Stoltey, recently told me, “My worst moment when I was aContinue reading “Five Books I’m Glad I Read in School”

The Perfect Antidote

By Eleanor Shelton The sun is shining brightly over the mountains, there are hiking trails, time galore to do what you want, wine, good food, naps, reading. It sounds like the perfect vacation, right? Except, it’s a writing retreat. So, where’s the writing? Where’s the inspiration when you have the ideal time for it? WhatContinue reading “The Perfect Antidote”