Books I Blame

by David E. Sharp I was not born with a laptop and a mug of black coffee in my hands. This is a fact for which my mother is still grateful. It took a lot of tragic, misguiding circumstances to set me on my course to become a writer. The story, as I tell it,Continue reading “Books I Blame”

Battle of The Bards: Poetry Is A Challenge

By Shelley Widhalm Writing a poem a day is like marriage—it’s a commitment that takes loyalty, honesty, and authenticity.  Saying “I will,” I undertook the Poem a Day Challenge in September 2017 and have written nearly 1,600 poems since. I missed a few days in winter 2020 during surgery recovery and at the end ofContinue reading “Battle of The Bards: Poetry Is A Challenge”

Headshots. Not Only For Zombies.

By Brian Kaufman In my novel, Dead Beyond the Fence, headshots were a pretty big deal. The ambulatory dead kept coming unless you wallop them above the shoulders. My protagonist used a tool formerly used to open crates or pry apart boards. This prompted one kind reviewer to comment, “Kaufman is the new king of theContinue reading “Headshots. Not Only For Zombies.”

May The 4th Be with You

By Eleanor Shelton It was recently May 4th. Don’t mock. An argument could be made that it is a more appropriate holiday than the following day. George Lucas has said that he was inspired by of the earliest Celtic stories of Arthur and the paladins in The Mabinogion and reimagined it as a space odyssey.Continue reading “May The 4th Be with You”

Word Count Woes

By Eleanor Shelton As we all know, stories have a beginning, middle, and end. Nothing new there. But just how many words it takes to get there is highly regulated, especially for debut novelists. All novels should be at least 60,000 words. Otherwise, they’re novellas. Less than 20,000, and they’re short stories. And depending onContinue reading “Word Count Woes”

Accountability Partners: Man, Beast, or Tech

By Eleanor Shelton My Fitbit died last week. It had always been on my wrist (other than showers) for the last year and a half. It held me accountable for moving more, celebrated when I moved a lot more, and actually told me the time. Something is missing that had become part of me.

Giving Props Where Props Are Due

By David E. Sharp Romance is a genre that gets a lot of flak. And I must admit I am not an avid reader of it. But I am a librarian, and as such, I hold that every book has its reader. I was recently privileged to live out a love story of my own,Continue reading “Giving Props Where Props Are Due”

PANDEMIC READING LIST

BY ELEANOR SHELTON Originally posted April 23, 2020 I wonder … during a pandemic when we are quarantined, what do we gravitate toward to read? Is it time for a view of the human condition that pokes fun like Where’d You Go, Bernadette? Or the quirky essays of David Sedaris? Or how many of usContinue reading “PANDEMIC READING LIST”