What gets more attention? Description or action?

By Shelley Widhalm If you want to keep readers turning pages, the key is balancing description with action. Readers get bored with too much description, and they get overwhelmed with all action and no breaks. Action in a novel or short story keeps the pace moving at a rapid clip, while description can slow theContinue reading “What gets more attention? Description or action?”

Proper Care And Feeding of Your Inner Troll

By David E. Sharp The writing journey is a hazardous one, full of setbacks and self-doubt. I remember asking myself why I thought I had a story to tell. I felt like a fraud. The sight of my manuscript in progress would put me into a tailspin of criticism and despair. I wondered if AmazonContinue reading “Proper Care And Feeding of Your Inner Troll”

NaNoWriMo: The Speed Writing Challenge

By Shelley Widhalm Every fall, do you start thinking about NaNoWriMo’s built-in goal and deadline as a Yea or a Nay? Like me, maybe you’re a veteran author who’s done it before, or possibly committing to writing 50,000 words during November is new to you. Divided up to a daily count, it is 1,667 words.Continue reading “NaNoWriMo: The Speed Writing Challenge”

Developing A Formula

By Katie Lewis We’ve all become overly familiar with isolation in the last two years. While it’s undeniable that on a worldwide scale, the vast experience tended toward the negative, setting aside time to be alone remains an essential part of the creative process.  Many writers find the act of cloistering important to their creativeContinue reading “Developing A Formula”

Ode to The Writer’s Retreat

By Ronda Simmons There once was a writer with Block Who needed to stop and take stock. Her prose was a mess, Her nerves were in stress, She wanted to hide in a rock. She reread her draft with disgust. Her literary dreams dashed to dust.

When The Writing Happens

by David E Sharp My children can argue about anything. Sudden shouts rise through the house to alert the family that a disagreement has reared its ugly head. My job is to intervene before violence erupts. In theory, I want to give them a chance to work things out on their own.

One of The Least Favorite Most Important Jobs for Writers

By David E. Sharp I have no passion for marketing. Naturally, at a recent writing conference I attended, sessions on marketing were at the top of my list. I learned about marketing through algorithms, marketing via the website, marketing at live events, and marketing through subliminal messaging.

Thoughts on Criticism

By Brian Kaufman Writers compose in a vacuum. The voices they hear are in their heads. Imagination has benefits, both for mental health and creative purposes. According to neuroscientists, people have “default networks” in their brains that become active (and are exercised) when they drift into the realm of imagination. In addition, storytelling allows anContinue reading “Thoughts on Criticism”

Are You Published?

By Amy Rivers An author walks into a conference. She smiles, shakes hands, and introduces herself to fellow authors. Then someone asks the question, “are you published?” She immediately starts to sweat. Why you ask? Because this loaded question is frequently followed by some variation of the qualifying question, “Who did you publish with?” 

Are You Living in A Novel?

By David E. Sharp Among my early writings was a theatrical production about an evening of fine dining gone horribly wrong. Faux pas are made. The kitchen catches fire. A food critic dies. Twice. You get the idea. We staged it in a restaurant with no stage. The audience simply enjoyed it from a uniqueContinue reading “Are You Living in A Novel?”