It Can (And Should) Happen.

By Eleanor Shelton There was a French female rugby player who was a shoo-in for the French national rugby team. The Olympics were on the horizon. She even got the five rings tattooed on her forearm. One day she was jogging through the woods, a place she regularly ran, when a tree randomly fell onContinue reading “It Can (And Should) Happen.”

Abandoned

By Brian Kaufman Having finished two novels and grown tired of rejections, I began to write a third novel. I had a clever idea and a marvelous, operatic ending in mind. 35.000 words in, I realized I’d dead-ended. I stuck my stack of legal pads in a box (this was before home computers walked theContinue reading “Abandoned”

Flawlessness Is Flawed

By David E. Sharp I don’t know why anyone would trust me with hiring practices. Nevertheless, I have been on both sides of the job interview process. When I conducted interviews for positions in a Texas library, I had a canned set of questions I was supposed to ask. Among them was the single-most hatedContinue reading “Flawlessness Is Flawed”

Who Are We Writing For?

An audience is the target of your communication. Written communication is an odd duck because the transmission is not immediate. When you speak to someone in person, the communication is rooted at that particular moment. The written word typically exists without a direct interface. This is important because for a connection to be made, theContinue reading “Who Are We Writing For?”

Word Count Woes

By Eleanor Shelton As we all know, stories have a beginning, middle, and end. Nothing new there. But just how many words it takes to get there is highly regulated, especially for debut novelists. All novels should be at least 60,000 words. Otherwise, they’re novellas. Less than 20,000, and they’re short stories. And depending onContinue reading “Word Count Woes”

The Weird And Wonderful Habits We Love

By Ronda Simmons So, I’m in my office staring at a blank screen. I can’t figure out what’s wrong. My dog is sleeping at my feet, a hot cup of tea sits next to my keyboard, and the house is quiet. Why can’t I write? I’m not hungry, or itchy, or tired. I am notContinue reading “The Weird And Wonderful Habits We Love”

The Highs And Lows of Writing

By David E. Sharp When I naively embarked on a quest to write and publish my first novel, I felt like I was climbing a mountain. Every step took me closer to the summit. Sometimes it seemed within reach. Other times I couldn’t see it, and I questioned whether it was really up there. ButContinue reading “The Highs And Lows of Writing”

The Fine Line of Writing Historical

By Brian Kaufman Though I write in multiple genres, I tend to circle back to one genre in particular. Three of my published novels are historical fiction. My first novel, The Breach, told the Alamo’s story from the Mexican point of view. That book took me three years to research, two years to write, and anotherContinue reading “The Fine Line of Writing Historical”

I Am A Literary Hypochondriac

By Eleanor Shelton I come by it, naturally. My aunt was always dying of something horrible (she actually did die of something terrible). My grandmother was convinced she had cancer (she never had cancer). If I have a headache, an ache, a pain, I’m sure I have COVID, an autoimmune disease, or malignant tumors. JustContinue reading “I Am A Literary Hypochondriac”